Hazing Policy

 

The University at Buffalo Division of Athletics supports only those activities which are constructive, educational, inspirational, and that contribute to student-athletes' intellectual and personal development. UB Athletics unequivocally opposes any situation created intentionally to produce mental, emotional or physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment, or ridicule.

The University at Buffalo's Code of Student Conduct defines hazing as: any action or situation that recklessly or intentionally endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student, or that willfully destroys or removes public property for the purpose of initiation or admission into, or affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in, any registered student organization.

The NCAA defines hazing as: Any act committed against someone joining or becoming a member or maintaining membership in any organization that is humiliating, intimidating or demeaning, or endangers the health and safety of the person. Hazing includes active or passive participation in such acts and occurs regardless of the willingness to participate in the activities. Hazing creates an environment/climate in which dignity and respect are absent.

 
 Hazing vs. Team Building

Hazing

Team Building

humiliates and degrades

promotes respect and dignity

tears down individuals

supports and empowers

creates division

creates real teamwork

lifelong nightmares

lifelong memories

shame and secrecy

pride and integrity

is a power trip

is a shared positive experience!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: http://www.ncaa.org/sites/default/files/hazing%20prevention%20handbook%2057315.pdf

 

New York State Hazing Law:

Section 120.16- Hazing in the First Degree: A person is guilty of hazing in the first degree when, in the course of another person's initiation into or affiliation with any organization, they intentionally or recklessly engages in conduct which creates a substantial risk of physical injury to such other person or a third person and thereby causes such injury. Hazing in the first degree is a class A misdemeanor.

Section 120.17- Hazing in the Second Degree: A person is guilty of hazing in the second degree when, in the course of another person's initiation or affiliation with any organization, they intentionally or recklessly engages in conduct which created a substantial risk of physical injury to such other person or a third person. Hazing in the second degree is a violation.

 

 

Prohibited Behaviors:

Actions and activities that may be prohibited under The University at Buffalo's Code of Student Conduct, the Division of Athletics Hazing Policy and the NCAA; and may be a violation of New York State law, regardless of the person's intention or willingness to participate, include, but are not limited to, the following:

1. Subtle Hazing:

Behaviors that emphasize a power imbalance between new members and other members of the group or team. Subtle hazing typically involves activities or attitudes that breach reasonable standards of mutual respect, and place new members on the receiving end of ridicule, embarrassment and/or humiliation. Some examples include but are not limited to: deception, name calling, social isolation, and deprivation of privileges others have access to.

2. Harassment Hazing:

Behaviors that cause emotional anguish or physical discomfort, confuses and frustrates, and causes undue stress. Some examples include but are not limited to: verbal abuse, threats, humiliating acts or attire, sleep deprivation, personal service acts (such as carrying books, cooking meals, cleaning etc.).

3. Violent Hazing:

Behaviors that have the potential to, and frequently do, cause physical and/or emotional, or psychological harm. Some examples include but are not limited to: any form of assault, branding, public nudity, exposure to extreme weather, forced or coerced ingestion of substances.

 

Source: http://www.ncaa.org/sites/default/files/hazing%20prevention%20handbook%2057315.pdf

 

Hate Crimes:

A criminal offense committed against a person or property which is motivated, in whole or in part, by the offender’s bias. Bias is a preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their race, gender, religion, disability, sexual orientation or ethnicity/national origin. Hazing based on any of the following could be considered a hate crime:

  • Race. A preformed negative attitude toward a group of persons who possess common physical characteristics (e.g., color of skin, eyes, and/or hair; facial features, etc.) genetically transmitted by descent and heredity, which distinguish them as a distinct division of humankind (e.g., Asians, blacks, whites).
  • Gender. A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons because those persons are male or female.
  • Gender Identity. Gender identity means having or being perceived as having a gender identity, self-image, appearance, behavior or expression whether or not that gender identity, self-image, appearance, behavior or expression is different from that traditionally associated with the sex assigned to that person at birth.
  • Gender Dysphoria. Gender dysphoria is a recognized medical condition related to an individual having a gender identity different from the sex assigned to him or her at birth.
  • Religion. A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons who share the same religious beliefs regarding the origin and purpose of the universe and the existence or nonexistence of a supreme being (e.g., Catholics, Jews, Protestants, atheists).
  • Sexual orientation. A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their sexual attraction toward, and responsiveness to, members of their own sex or members of the opposite sex (e.g., gays, lesbians, heterosexuals).
  • Transgender. A transgender person is an individual who has a gender identity different from the sex assigned to him or her at birth.
  • Ethnicity/national origin. A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons of the same race or national origin who share common or similar traits, languages, customs and traditions (e.g., Arabs, Hispanics).
  • Disability. A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their physical or mental impairments/challenges, whether such disability is temporary or permanent, congenital or acquired by heredity, accident, injury, advanced age or illness.


Questions for Athletes to Consider
:

If you are uncertain about specific activities, take into consideration the following:

  • Is the activity required for team membership? If not required, is there an expectation or peer pressure for a team member to participate?
  • Would you object to the activity being videotaped and shown to parents or athletics administrators?
  • Does the activity have one group (i.e. upperclassmen) doing something to another group (i.e. new players)?
  • Is there risk of psychological damage?

If "yes" is answered to one or more of the above questions, it most likely will be interpreted as hazing. Spending a considerable amount of time questioning whether or not a particular activity violates the hazing policy is usually a good indication that the activity is indeed hazing.

Reporting Suspected Hazing Activities:

It is the responsibility of the Division of Athletics staff, as well as the student-athletes, to help ensure compliance with this policy. As such, the following guidelines apply:

  • Individuals who have knowledge of (either by viewing or participating in) hazing activities, or who suspect that hazing activities may occur or have already occurred, must report such activities to the appropriate Division of Athletics staff/administrator. The individuals must thoroughly cooperate in an investigation by university officials as stated in the University Code of Conduct.
  • Those not reporting hazing activities, not cooperating, or providing false or misleading information will be subject to team and University sanctions.

Corrective Measures/Sanctions:

When the University has determined that hazing has occurred, corrective measures may be applied to those individuals involved in the incident, as well as any individuals who fails to report/act on hazing information. This may include, but is not limited to:

  • Sanctions from the University, including a reprimand, educational sessions, University probation, dismissal from the University.
  • Sanctions from the Division of Athletics, including reduction in practice/competition participation, alteration of athletics grant-in-aid, suspension/dismissal from the team
  • Sanctions from the NCAA
  • Possible criminal charges

For the complete outline of the Student Code of Conduct, please visit:
https://www.buffalo.edu/content/dam/www/studentlife/units/uls/student-conduct/ub-student-code-of-conduct.pdf